Home | Contact | Privacy | About |
This forum uses cookies
This forum makes use of cookies to store your login information if you are registered, and your last visit if you are not. Cookies are small text documents stored on your computer; the cookies set by this forum can only be used on this website and pose no security risk. Cookies on this forum also track the specific topics you have read and when you last read them. Please confirm whether you accept or reject these cookies being set.

A cookie will be stored in your browser regardless of choice to prevent you being asked this question again. You will be able to change your cookie settings at any time using the link in the footer.

Welcome, Guest
You have to register before you can post on our site.

Username/Email:
  

Password
  





Search Forums

(Advanced Search)

Forum Statistics
» Members: 1,524
» Latest member: ybixys
» Forum threads: 378
» Forum posts: 1,723

Full Statistics

Online Users
There are currently 45 online users.
» 0 Member(s) | 44 Guest(s)
Bing

Latest Threads
I'm New Here
Forum: Introduction
Last Post: Manihot
11-06-2019, 08:12 PM
» Replies: 3
» Views: 47
Tomatoes will soon be res...
Forum: Crops & Plantation Farming
Last Post: FarmKing
11-04-2019, 10:03 PM
» Replies: 1
» Views: 45
Modified Panchakavya: An ...
Forum: Crops & Plantation Farming
Last Post: FarmKing
11-04-2019, 09:59 PM
» Replies: 2
» Views: 26
Lemon Grass as Intercrop ...
Forum: Crops & Plantation Farming
Last Post: FarmKing
11-04-2019, 09:59 PM
» Replies: 1
» Views: 21
How long does it take tom...
Forum: Crops & Plantation Farming
Last Post: Henlus
10-28-2019, 09:32 PM
» Replies: 1
» Views: 1,299
Prunning Pepper
Forum: Crops & Plantation Farming
Last Post: Henlus
10-28-2019, 09:29 PM
» Replies: 1
» Views: 280
Liquid Manure Killing pla...
Forum: Crops & Plantation Farming
Last Post: Henlus
10-28-2019, 09:27 PM
» Replies: 1
» Views: 288
Where can i get whitefly ...
Forum: Crops & Plantation Farming
Last Post: Henlus
10-28-2019, 09:19 PM
» Replies: 1
» Views: 298
Growing Maggot for Animal...
Forum: Livestock Farming
Last Post: Henlus
10-27-2019, 07:53 PM
» Replies: 16
» Views: 12,879
Getting Rid of Flies
Forum: Livestock Farming
Last Post: Henlus
10-19-2019, 11:06 PM
» Replies: 3
» Views: 2,917
How to determine the size...
Forum: Livestock Farming
Last Post: Henlus
10-19-2019, 10:34 PM
» Replies: 1
» Views: 1,690
Ethanol Fuel from Cassava
Forum: Agro-Processing
Last Post: Henlus
10-19-2019, 08:20 PM
» Replies: 3
» Views: 3,054
Best Planting Season for ...
Forum: Crops & Plantation Farming
Last Post: Henlus
10-19-2019, 04:43 PM
» Replies: 4
» Views: 5,776
Download Feed Formulae fo...
Forum: Livestock Farming
Last Post: Henlus
10-01-2019, 10:36 PM
» Replies: 63
» Views: 34,785
Controling Damping-off an...
Forum: Crops & Plantation Farming
Last Post: Henlus
09-19-2019, 12:58 AM
» Replies: 0
» Views: 184
Using Wood Ash as Fertili...
Forum: Crops & Plantation Farming
Last Post: Henlus
09-19-2019, 12:47 AM
» Replies: 0
» Views: 112
Controlling Pepper Diseas...
Forum: Crops & Plantation Farming
Last Post: Henlus
09-19-2019, 12:40 AM
» Replies: 0
» Views: 117
Treating Respiratory Infe...
Forum: Livestock Farming
Last Post: Henlus
09-19-2019, 12:26 AM
» Replies: 0
» Views: 150
Facts about Goat Health
Forum: Livestock Farming
Last Post: Henlus
08-30-2019, 01:21 AM
» Replies: 5
» Views: 296
Goat Feed Formulae
Forum: Livestock Farming
Last Post: Henlus
08-28-2019, 10:12 PM
» Replies: 9
» Views: 448

 
  EnergyBin Biogas Units
Posted by: srinivaskasulla - 05-04-2015, 08:40 AM - Forum: Agro-Processing - Replies (3)

EnergyBin Biogas Plants - Low cost ready to use PLUG and PLAY modules for all types of biodegardable wastes.
EnergyBin is available in various sizes such as - EnergyBin 250, EnergyBin 500, EnergyBin 750, EnergyBin 1000, EnergyBin 1500 & EnergyBin 2000.
EnergyBin biogas plants can be installed for treating biodegradable waste and converting it to BIOGAS which can further be used directly for Thermal Application or Electricity generation.
EnergyBin 250 Pics - Attached
EnergyBin 500 Pics - Attached
EnergyBin 750 Pics - Attached

For more details visit - www.xeonwm.com or
Email: info@xeonwm.com OR srinivaskasulla@xeonwm.com OR srinivaskasulla@gmail.com

[Image: target=post;postID=1663147582535142092;o...c=postname]



Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
       
Print this item

  I am new
Posted by: agrichaven - 05-04-2015, 04:31 AM - Forum: Introduction - Replies (4)

Hello farmers, I am new here. I just started with vegetable farming, cucumber to be precise. Hope to learn a lot here.

Print this item

  Pasted Vent: Causes and Solution
Posted by: Henlus - 05-01-2015, 10:32 PM - Forum: Livestock Farming - Replies (3)

Pasted vent is common in chicks but not in adult chickens. It is also called pasting, vent gleet or pasty butt. It is a situation whereby dry droppings seal off the vent of chicks so that they’re unable to pass out droppings. This is a serious condition that needs immediate attention. So it is very important that you always keep an eye out for signs pasted vent. Signs include:
Lack of appetite
Lethargy (weakness)
Huddling near heat source and fluffed up downs.
..
When the downs or feathers around the vent area are stained with droppings, this is not pasting. Pasting occurs only when the vent is sealed off. It is usually unnecessary to clean this off. However, if it is a thick mass of droppings, clean it off.

Causes of Pasting
Pasting can be caused by anything that stresses the chicks or by anything that cause loose/watery droppings. Cold and too high temperature can cause it. Under high temperature, the birds drink more water and this result in loose droppings. Worms, coccidiosis, illness, conditions that cause diarrhea etc can also cause pasting.
Prevention
1. Avoid chilling or overheating by providing the correct brooder temperature for the chicken age. 2. Prevent disease and parasite infections by observing strict biosecurity measures, keep the brooder clean and dry.

Treatment
Remove the dropping blocking the vent. If it is soft, you can simply remove it with a stick. If it is dry and hard, it would require soaking with warm water. Rarely, the dry droppings will extend into the vent. In this case, warm, food grade oil can help loosen the mass so that it can be passed. After removing the past, ensure that you clean and thoroughly dry the chicks before returning her to the brooder, else she might get chilled and the problem will reoccur.

WARNING: Don’t mistake the navel/dried umbilical cord of a new chick for a pasted vent! While the vent is beneath the tail, the navel is further down toward the legs/belly. If you remove the scab over an open navel, the chick will likely die and miserably.
..
If you suspect that the pasting is due to illness, call in a vet for proper treatment.

Print this item

  Comparing Fuel Value of Biogas with Firewood, Diesel, Petrol, Kerosene, Cow Dung, LPG
Posted by: Henlus - 05-01-2015, 10:24 PM - Forum: Agro-Processing - Replies (3)

The following applies to biogas containing:
..
Methane (CH4): 50-70 vol.%, carbon dioxide (CO2): 28-48 vol.%, other gases: up to 2 vol.%.
..
1 kg firewood = 200 litres (0.2m3) biogas.
..
2. 1 kg dried cow dung = 100 litres (0.1m3) biogas. Note: Some people use dried cow dung as fuel in cooking, e.g. India.
..
3. 1 kg charcoal = 500 (0.5m3) liters biogas.
..
4. 1m3 of biogas is equivalent to 0.45 litre of petrol, 0.55 litre of diesel, 0.60 litre of kerosene, or 0.5 kg of LPG.
..
You can use this data to determine how much fuel biogas will save you. From that you can calculate the worth of your biogas in terms of money.


Image source: https://www.pinterest.co.uk/explore/anae...digestion/



Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
Print this item

  Volume of Biogas Needed for Cooking, Electricity and Lighting
Posted by: Henlus - 05-01-2015, 10:17 PM - Forum: Agro-Processing - No Replies

Methane (CH4): 50-70 vol.%, carbon dioxide (CO2): 28-48 vol.%, other gases: up to 2 vol.%.
..
1. The gas consumption per person and meal = 150-300 litres biogas.
..
2. Boiling 1 litre of water = 30-40 litre of biogas
..
3. Boiling 1/2 kg rice = 120-140 litres of biogas.
..
4. Boiling 1/2 kg legumes = 160-190 litres of biogas.
..
NB: 1L = 0.001m3 (cubic meter)

5. What can 1 m3 biogas do?
..
a. It can illuminate a gas lamp equivalent of 60 W non-electricity saving bulb for about 7 hours, resulting in a light performance efficiency of only 7%, 93% of the energy content is transformed into heat.
..
b. It can cook 3 meals for a family of 5-6 persons.
..
c. It can generate 2 kWh of electricity, the rest turns into heat which can also be used for heating applications.
..
d. It is equivalent to 5.5 kg of firewood.
..
e. It is equivalent to 1.5 kg of charcoal.
..
f. It is equivalent to 0.45 litre of petrol, 0.55 litre of diesel, 0.60 litre of kerosene, or 0.5 kg of LPG.


Image source: https://www.pinterest.co.uk/explore/anae...digestion/



Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
Print this item

  Delousing
Posted by: Henlus - 05-01-2015, 10:09 PM - Forum: Livestock Farming - Replies (1)

If necessary, delousing should be carried out by dipping in 0.25 percent weak pesticide (sumithion, malathion or sevin) solutions at 17 weeks, if birds seem to be affected by external parasites. Perform dipping only on hot, sunny days. Take care to avoid dipping the head into the medicated solution. Leave the bird outside after dipping, to facilitate drying by sunlight. External parasite infestation may be prevented by ensuring that the floors are solid without cracks, and painting the wooden supports with a petrol-and-oil mixture or 40 percent nicotin sulphate dilution.

Print this item

  Rice: How to Boost Production Massively
Posted by: Henlus - 05-01-2015, 10:08 PM - Forum: Crops & Plantation Farming - No Replies

When rice paddies are flooded in the spring, they can be inoculated with Azolla, which then quickly multiplies to cover the water, suppressing weeds. The rotting plant material releases nitrogen to the rice plants, providing up to 9 tonnes of protein per hectare per year.

Print this item

  Weeder Geese
Posted by: Henlus - 05-01-2015, 10:05 PM - Forum: Livestock Farming - Replies (4)

Geese eat grass and weeds as fast as they grow, but do not touch certain cultivated plants. They also add manure to the soil.
Geese seem to be more resistant to diseases than other avian species.
Uses: They can be use for weed control and as guard animals. They can be use to control heavy infestation by water hyacinth. They have exceptional eyesight and wide field of vision. Outsiders cannot calm them to silence. They are also used by the military and in some cases, they replace guard dogs.

Image: http://www.moosemanorfarms.com/about-ame...geese.html
Breeds:
White Chinese geese are the favorites for weeding purposes, or Africans where a larger bird is desired for marketing at the end of the weeding season. These geese are more energetic and active than Toulouse and Emden, although those breeds are also used. The White chinese geese will do less damage to the crop they step on, because of their lighter weight. They lay more eggs and a better guards.
Disadvantage in Developing Areas: They take 2 years to fully mature and they are not prolific layers, except for the Chinese geese. Therefore, their overall reproductive rate is low. Also, the processing of geese is more complicated than the processing of chickens, especially if downs and feathers are involve. Technical skills are needed to pluck the birds efficiently and some equipment may be necessary in order to handle the down and feathers properly.
Stocking: 2-4 geese per acre in row planting. More may be needed in bed and when grass and weed infestation is heavy. It is better to place them in the field when the first grass/weeds starts growing.
Field Management: Day old should be brooded for 6-8 weeks before releasing to the field permanently without shelter.Younger birds can be used if they’ll be sheltered.
Goslings can be turned out on grass within a few days and supplemental feeding of grain started the second week.
Water Trough: Place them in the far end of rows so that the geese will work the full length of rows on their way to drink. Water troughs may be moved occasionally to make birds concentrate their efforts where they are most needed. If there are no trees, provide temporary structures for shade.
Supplemental Feed: Small amount must be provided. 5-20lb a day per 100 birds. Don’t give them too much though.
Grower-mash pellets should be used as supplemental feed until at least 1 weeks of age. After which grain may be used, but it is better to supplement grain with chicken or turkey grower pellets (non-medicated).
Feed them once per day in the evening by scaterring the feed on the ground. This gives all birds the opportunity to feed.
Fencing: High fences are not required as geese seldom fly. A 4-30 inch fence is ok. Poultry netting supported by stakes often is used where temporary fencing is desired. At night, you can prevent animal attack by using light where the geese congregate.
Insecticides: Some insecticidesand are dangerous to them. Fertilizers are also dangerous. Remove them from the field when spraying and do not return them for several days. If there is rain, do not return them until puddles where insecticides have collect disappear into the ground. Herbicides apparently, are not harmful.
Marketing: You can fatten them in a cage before sale. Feed them all the grain they’ll consume 3-4 times a day. Continue for 3-4 weeks until they weigh 10-12lb or more. Growing mash or fattening pellets must be fed with grain for efficient feed conversion.
Next Batch: Carrying geese over from one season to the next is not recommended. Older geese are less active in hot weather than young birds. Adult geese will eat more Johnsongrass roots turned up during tillage than goslings, but are more difficult to restrain from crossing fences. It is usually less expensive to buy goslings in the spring than to carry old birds through the winter.
Crops: Geese can be used for cotton, strawberries, in nurseries, corn, beans, asparagus, mint, beets, hops, onions, potatoes, orchards, groves and vineyard etc. They seems to perform well in crops such as coffee, banana and plantain, as well as kiwi plantation and cotton fields, where chemical control is not practiced or is not possible.
Goose production fit in well with corn production. They will eat young corn plants, so they should be placedin the field sometime after the last cultivation when the corn has been “laid by” (Cultivate for the last time). After corn is harvested, the geese are allowed to remain in the field to pick up shattered grain to fatten for market.
Training: You can train your geese to eat grasses and weeds they don’t normally eat by feeding them the grasses/weeds when they are still young. Alternatively, feed them all the weeds/grasses at a tender age.
Company: As geese are herbivores, you can add a small number of ducks to help control insects, snails and slugs.
You should have a temporary holding pen where they will be kept when there is no grass.



Attached Files
.jpg   weeder-geese.jpg (Size: 42.12 KB / Downloads: 7)
Print this item

  Some facts About Biogas
Posted by: Henlus - 05-01-2015, 10:03 PM - Forum: Agro-Processing - Replies (2)

1. Biogas usually contains about 55-65% methane, 30-35% carbon dioxide, and some hydrogen, nitrogen and other impurities. Its heating value is around 600 BTU per cubic foot (21 BTU per litre).

2. Natural gas contains about 80% methane, with a heating value of around 1000 BTU per cubic foot (35 BTU per litre).

3. Filtering biogas, or "scrubbing" it, can remove the carbon dioxide and the other impurities, raising the BTU.

4. There are two basic types of digester, batch digesters and continuous digesters. Batch digesters are filled with a mixture of organic wastes and water (slurry) and sealed, and emptied again when they stop producing gas. Continuous-load digesters are fed a daily load of slurry, with gas and digestion wastes produced continuously.

5. Biogas digestion works best at 25 to 35 deg C, 77-95 deg F.

6. One pound (0.45 kg) of cow manure can produce about one cubic foot of gas (28 litres) at around 28 deg C (82 deg F) — enough to cook a day's meals for 4-6 people in India.

7. About 1.7 cubic metres of biogas (60 cubic feet) equals one litre of gasoline (1/4 gallon). The manure produced by one cow in one year can produce enough methane to replace more than 200 litres of gasoline (53 gallons).

Image source: https://www.pinterest.co.uk/explore/anae...digestion/



Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
Print this item

  Oxygenating Fish Pond with Ozone
Posted by: Manihot - 04-04-2015, 02:12 PM - Forum: Aquaculture - Replies (1)

Since ozone contains more oxygen than oxygen itself, and it is 10 times more soluble in water than oxygen. From my research, I see that ozone is easy to produce from oxygen. So I'm thinking of the possibility of oxygenating high density fish ponds with ozone rather than the costly practice of agitating or bubbling air into the water. What do you think?

Print this item

  CROWNEY FARMS & SERVICES
Posted by: crowneyfarms - 03-31-2015, 08:44 AM - Forum: Introduction - Replies (2)

We are a group of experienced Nigerian poultry production managers and poultry health professionals who are committed to making your poultry and allied businesses profitable.

We achieve this by providing services on:
Day-old chicks and point-of-lay production & supply;
Poultry production and health consultancy;
Poultry produce (egg and chicken) marketing;
Poultry Farm establishment and management;
Feed mill establishment and management.

Feel free to call upon us concerning any issue about your poultry and allied businesses in Nigeria.
CROWNEY FARMS AND SERVICES
crowneyfarms@gmail.com
07031221037

Print this item

  Feeding Sprouted Grain to Goats
Posted by: Trimex - 03-30-2015, 04:41 PM - Forum: Livestock Farming - Replies (1)

I've read an interesting article about feeding sprouted grains to goats. They said it increase milk yield and digestibility. How do you guys see it? Here is the article http://www.permies.com/t/9274/goats/Sprouting-Goat-Feed.

Print this item

  Supplementary Light: am vs pm
Posted by: Trimex - 03-30-2015, 03:36 PM - Forum: Livestock Farming - Replies (1)

While giving chickens supplementary light, when is the best time to add it? In the early morning or late evening?

Print this item

  Moving a broody hen
Posted by: Trimex - 03-30-2015, 03:36 PM - Forum: Livestock Farming - Replies (1)

Can I move a broody hen and her nest to a new location without discouraging her from hatching the eggs?

Print this item

  Feed Consumption and Growth Rate Chart?
Posted by: Trimex - 03-30-2015, 03:35 PM - Forum: Livestock Farming - Replies (2)

Can some one provide me with a table that shows the growth rate and feed consumption of chickens, goats, rabbits, turkey etc?

Print this item

  Why shouldn’t we eat eggs/meat from animals that have been given some medication?
Posted by: Trimex - 03-30-2015, 03:34 PM - Forum: Livestock Farming - Replies (1)

Why shouldn’t we eat eggs/meat from animals that have been given some medication? I've read about people complaining about this a lot.

Print this item

  White vs Brown Eggs
Posted by: Sendrix - 03-30-2015, 12:56 PM - Forum: Livestock Farming - Replies (1)

Are Brown Eggs More Nutritious than White Eggs?

Print this item

  How to Peel Cooked Eggs Easily?
Posted by: Sendrix - 03-30-2015, 12:55 PM - Forum: Livestock Farming - Replies (4)

It’s funny, but you’ll find out that some eggs are easier to peel than others, why?

Print this item

  Powering an Engine with Biogas: How Much Biogas will You Need to Produce Daily?
Posted by: Henlus - 03-29-2015, 04:37 PM - Forum: Agro-Processing - Replies (2)

If you want to use your biogas digester to power an engine, it should be producing at least10 meter cube of biogas per day. To generate 1 kWh (kilowatt hour) of electricity with a generator, about 1m3 biogas is required. So the 10m3 biogas will generate 10kwh of electricity.


Image source: https://www.pinterest.co.uk/explore/anae...digestion/



Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
Print this item

  Am new here
Posted by: noblefarm - 03-29-2015, 03:57 PM - Forum: Introduction - Replies (11)

Am a businessman base in Ilorin, I decided to start farm last year, here to seek help from practical farmers

Print this item